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-american, harry reid calling them evil mongers, other people calling them mobs and thugs. the backlash against the democratic party here is astonishing. middle american by 2 to 1, they agree with the protesters and not with the democratic party. >> eleanor. >> first of all, cindy said to shout down over people views is un-american. they didn't call the shouters un-american. i think the president has lost momentum here. people who have insurance are worried that they are going to lose something in this very extensive package. and the president really doesn't have a single bill that he can point to. he doesn't have a clear message and all of the bills floating around on political provide lots of inviting targets for people who want to kill healthcare and want to kill the obama presidency along with it. the political stakes here are huge and the president has done a good job with the special interest. they are all tentatively on board. it's the political opposition that is much more intense this time and it seems to have caught the obama administration by surprise. >> you are seeing the americ
as well. two, it has to become a priority for our united states senate, and for harry reid, he has got to begin to work with not simply republicans, they are not going to vote for these democrats, but for democrats, the moderate democrats who are afraid ever standing up and voting for good, progressive judges. he has to approach those moderate democrats. he's got to butt recess those democrats. we have to give those democrats, and we know who they are, confidence in standing up for good judges. we need to ensure that the senators on the senate judiciary committee step up to the plate as well. now we know that justice sotomayor was a little bit tim id at those hearings -- timid at those hearings, but she had a job to do, and that was to get confirmed. the senators on those panels have to articulate, as everyone has said, a very broad vision of why judges are important, why courts are important, and why we need strong progressives on these courts. so we have all -- we all have our bit to do. i am confident that people listening will do our job, and we have to ensure that at the end of ei
tax that all of us pay. sean: i want to talk about the political implications. look at harry reid's numbers. chris god is in trouble. governors corzine and paterson of new york, corzine is losing by a lot. bob mcdonald has a big lead. toomey is plipping the polls by 20 some odd points. do you think this holds, as time goes on or is this a short-term bump for the republicans? >> it has long-term ramifications. between now and november of 2010 is like several geology call ages will come and go between now and then. but it is a significant change and likely to remain because the administration in my opinion is not going to respond in a appropriate way. we'll have our first test in november in new jersey and virginia. and i suspect we will see republican pickups. sean: sign that for me. karl rove. thanks. it's the preliminary year of our "sleep-in panel." you get to sleep in on sunday morning. but first, david axelrod, is he spasming you with e mails urging you to support it's a revolution in pain relief. (announcer) new icy hot medicated roll. for wherever you hurt. icy to dull pain,
the democratic party and against barack obama, read and as a policy. -- harry reid and nancy pelosi. we dodged one bullet when we did not go home. they told us to leave and we said no. we got organized with the two parties on april 15 and july 4 and the august revolt. every year, they write that something interesting happens in august. this is what happened. we happened. [applause] there is another mistake but we have avoided. that is that we have avoided the mistake that we made in 1996 and 1998 when we focused too much on bill clinton and his personal failings. bill clinton was a threat to the country because of the taxes and spending in the regulations that he supported an he more clearly supports now -- that he supported them and the more clearly supports now. -- that he supported then and keep more clearly supports now. this time around, we are focused with nancy pelosi and harry reid and those democrats in the house that are voting for higher taxes on energy. yes, barack obama is the guy who signs the bills at the end of the day. he is almost irrelevant. the damage is done by nancy pelos
are saying, stop. >> gregg: scott, in the beginning people like harry reid and nancy pelosi and surrogates of the president, were saying all these protestors and townhalls are not genuine, it's a setup. they are evil and unamerican. you have a pole of what americans think of these protestors? >> 49% believe they represent the views of their neighbors. 37% don't. by the way, not surprisingly is partisan view and harry reid were one of views the democrats felt and republicans had a different perspective of the situation. again, it's important to remember this is more than just about health care. it's part of the frustration. there is also a gap, 49% of people representing opinions of their neighbors. so people are squeamish about the behavior itself. >> julie: we used one of your polls and posed the question to the twitter followers who do you fear more. i found that one person wrote, i trusted government more, you can vote them out every four years but you cannot do the same with insurance ceos. and insurance companies, definitely and if we had more competition to private insurance companie
, current events, and politics. monday night chris andersen, and senate majority leader harry reid. >> coming up next book tv presents after words. this week in new york city ben mezrich. the accidental billionaires. mr. mezrich details the web site. its current international status and profiles several of the principal players and the development including the current ceo, mark zuckerberg. he discusses his book with a.j. jacobs, editor-at-large of esquire magazine. >> host: hello. my name is a.j. jacobs. book tv after words. i am here today with ben mezrich who has written about a very interesting book about the founding of this book called "the accidental billionaires". >> guest: thanks very much. >> host: as our viewers may know you have pretty much created your on literary genre of the financial thriller. these books about billionaire man who beat the system somehow. ton of cash. >> i write about young kids and wild things. they are usually geniuses who pulled something of, some sort of scheme. i am interested in people who made fortunes. more fun to hang out with crazy rich ki
're worried about reform. the senate leader harry reid was giving an interview to publication called "the hill" last week when he said the town hall protesters are evil-mongers using lie, innuendo and rumor to drown out rationale debate. i never heard that word before. but the latest poll says 62% of people ask say protesters at town hall meeting are really outraged over the healthcare reform plan. 29% side with reid camp saying they were fake mobs there to put on a show. >> jamie: for those of you who can't get to town hall meeting thousands are trying to speak out via your computer and you're finding it crowded on the internet superhighway. so many people e-mailed the representatives with questions and concerns that the house web servers were overloaded. >> technical personnel warning that it would be unresponsive and slow due to traffic. >> rick: a town hall exchange between doctor from georgia and congressman got heated and it got attention. the doctor challenge congressman on reform plan and the congressman mistakenly challenged the doctor where he was from and what his motives were. this
harry reid. >> being, influence, and money. on monday ellen miller on how they use the internet to provide transparency in government. >> this fall, enter the home to america's highest court, from the grand public places to those only accessible by the nine justices. the supreme court, coming the first sunday in october and c- span. -- on c-span. "washington journal" continues. host: martin and annelise anderson join us this morning with their book. good morning. guest: hello. host: thank you for being with us so early from california. guest: for many years, 20 years ago and when reagan left, he did a lot of things -- a lot of things he did were really good, especially in nuclear weapons and cold war and on stuff like that, but most people were always puzzled by reagan. how did you do these things? who was working for him, pulling his strings, things like that? we had worked with break in for some time. it has been a puzzle as to exactly what happened. recently, we were able to get the classified documents. once we had them and looked at them we saw what was happening. the book
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8

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